Food and Drugs

woman with chocolate on her face at table covered in half-eaten food

Food and Drugs


Food and Drugs

Food and Drugs
Food and Drugs
It is easy to switch addictions from using drugs to indulging with food. The transition is seemingly painless, although the consequences can be similar. Our brain reward system seems to respond in the same way to food as it does to drugs. A psychology study group from Yale University examined the effects of food stimulus on brain waves. It was concluded that viewing a milk shake, for some, will create the same activity in the region of the brain where drugs and alcohol affect the brain. Food addiction produces cravings, triggers and responses similar to drug addiction. Food addicts will often report losing control, eating more than planned, and anticipating consumption. All of these traits are similar to drug addiction. Biological forces are driving compulsions in this relationship and most will live to eat verses eating to live. Hence, it is one of the simplest addictions to switch to once in recovery from drugs. More women than men have fallen susceptible to this type of switch to a food addiction. However, in general females suffer more from eating disorders. Food is seen as comfort and can also be an escape for unwanted feelings. Much like drugs, food will be a loyal friend, always changing biochemistry in the body and brain and creating isolation and pain through prolonged abuse. Food addiction is one of the hardest addictions to treat because you simply cannot live without eating. It is just impossible. Everything in moderation is easier said than done. If moderation was something we as addicts could do, we may have never become addicts in the first place. Obviously the lesser of the two evils is food; however if abused can be just as devastating as a drug addict in recovery.